Ideas on Being a Good Writer

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What makes a good writer? Well it’s certainly not getting in front of a computer and typing with no concept of what you’re writing about. There’s no written strategy that is concrete, but there are things you can follow to achieve becoming a better writer. For me, I know when I get a book that I cannot put down, and also intrigues me to keep turning pages, it’s clearly written by a good writer.

A point to keep in mind is you want to grab the reader’s attention from the very first page. Another thing would be when you create your characters, make them come alive and pop—if you can get the reader feeling emotion you’re on the right track.

I’ve heard that the best thing about writing is being able to express what’s on your mind; a comment that I have to agree with whole heartedly. My early years in school, I was never one to be able to communicate the way I wanted because I was extremely shy. However, through my writing I excelled. Writing was my refuge in which my thoughts fluently poured out into bright vocabulary. No awkward moments or sounding stupid; just me being creative and insightful.

I will say that new writers can learn from experienced ones, and all it takes is simply reading. The more you know, the more you will improve in your vocabulary and your writing style, among other stuff. That’s what I think it takes to be a good writer. My advice for someone new starting out would be never give up and strive for the best.

Have a great weekend!

R. Lynn

Website:  www.rlynnarchie.com

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/EBooksByRLynnArchie

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/rlynnarchie

Writing Advice

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When I write I use my words as a communication source to express my ideas, turning those thoughts into novels or short stories. Writing for me is as natural as breathing and I do it because I love it.

This brings me to marketing guru and best-selling author, Seth Godin. He’s been called the “the ultimate entrepreneur for the Information Age” and in an article I recently read, he generously offers nineteen pieces of advice for aspiring writers.

The top three were really solid suggestions so I’ve listed them below:

1. Lower your expectations. The happiest authors are the ones that don’t expect much.

2. The best time to start promoting your book is three years before it comes out. Three years to build a reputation, build a permission asset, build a blog, build a following, build credibility and build the connections you’ll need later.

(I think this is good advice, however speaking only for myself, this one is unrealistic to me because I’m not that patient.)

3. Pay for an editor. Not just to fix the typos, but to actually make your ramblings into something that people will choose to read.

(If your budget does not allow for an editor then you should really make good use of your spelling and grammar check.)

Hope some of the tips helps some. Have a great day.

R. Lynn

Website:  www.rlynnarchie.com

Storetry # 6: It’s Here! A Collaboration Challenge for Poets and Writers. Get published.

Writings of a Mrs

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Welcome to Stuff It Tuesdays:  The Storetry Collaboration Challenge

I’d like to thank everyone for the fabulous contributions.  I really enjoy reading all of the submissions and putting the ‘Storetry’ (a word that I created, part story, part poetry) together.  I only wish I had more time to spend on it!

This is my sixth installment of the Stuff It Tuesday ‘Storetry’ Collaboration Challenge.

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50 Reasons Not To Date A Poet

Betty Generic

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It may sound romantic, but in search of that elusive metaphor, poets can be somewhat  “eccentric.”

  1. If you date a poet everyone will think you are the jerk they are writing about.
  2. You will be the jerk they are writing about.
  3. They have an unnatural affection for book stores and office supply stores.
  4. They have deep conversations with Animals, Clouds, and Grecian Urns.
  5. Excessive use of  “poetry hands.”
  6. Excessive abuse of  “poetic licence.”
  7. Excessive use of  “melancholy.”
  8. Excessive use of  “dramatic emphasis.”
  9. They collect obscure words that have not been in circulation for at least 100 years or more.
  10. They insert these antediluvian words into conversations just to rebel.
  11. They think children’s books are sublime.
  12. They refuse to care where the remote is.
  13. All of their furniture are positioned around windows, for them to stare out for hours at a time.
  14. Your parents will think they are possessed.
  15. They are possessed.
  16. You…

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The Falling of Love by Marisa Oldham (Book Review)

Spring is in full effect, and because of that I’ve made it a necessity to refill my library. From time to time, you will see books pop up that I will be adding to my “Interesting Books to Read” list. Today I start off with romance novel, The Falling of Love (The Falling Series) by Marisa Oldham.

BOOK REVIEW

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The Falling of Love by Marissa Oldham

The story starts out with teenagers Grace Hathaway and Ian Taylor, a miss matched couple as seen by their high school peers. Grace is a gentle beauty who’s sweet and on the cheerleading squad where newcomer Ian is the new “rocker” boy in school, and not kindly welcomed. Regardless of what everyone’s thinks the two grow to love each other very much.

Their feelings for each other are bottomless, and you would think that it would soar high from there, but it doesn’t, and that’s because there are undisclosed family circumstances that Ian has found hard to share with Grace. When she’s finally informed of his troubles, she sheds new light onto his problem and finds a solution that makes their days happy again. Sadly, it’s short lived due to their nonstop longing desire. An emotional pull that interrupts their fairytale world, and forces them to delve into adulthood sooner than later.

From there it only plummets downhill due to a new location and Ian’s constant tug of war. On one hand, he has Grace, the love of his life whom he declares he would do anything for; but then, on the other hand, he’s fighting an enormous battle for another love that he’s finding difficult to end.

The story contains a lot of in-depth situations that will pull at your heart. There are also other noteworthy characters that play significant roles throughout the plot. I find it to be an enjoyable read, and an emotional wrenching love story that will be hard to put down.

Her book is available on Amazon. Please visit her website, http://authormarisaoldham.bravesites.com/the-falling-of-love,  to find out more about her novel and other locations where it can be purchased.

Enjoy your weekend,

R. Lynn

Website:  www.rlynnarchie.com

ISBN Numbers and How to Get One

Helpful article.

Savvy Writers & e-Books online

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Selling your e-book on Amazon, Barnes&Noble, Apple or Kobo doesn’t require an ISBN, but it will be necessary, as soon as you start your books print version. Any book on your book shelf, library or in book stores has an ISBN.

ISBN is the International Standard Book Number, a 13-digit number that uniquely identifies books published anywhere in the world. Parts of an ISBN are:

  • group or country identified
  • publisher identifier
  • title identifier
  • and the check digit

ISBN numbers are assigned by a group of agencies worldwide coordinated by the International ISBN Agency in London, England. In the United States, ISBN’s are assigned by the U.S. ISBN Agency: R.R. Bowker is the independent agent in the US for this system.  You can order an ISBN online – or even better, a block of ten. On average it takes about two weeks for ISBN’s to be assigned.  In…

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