Book Review: Earthman Jack vs. The Ghost Planet

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First let me say this is not romance book, but science fiction.  Every now and then I do like reading something different.  I have to say that “Earthman Jack vs. The Ghost Planet” was an enjoyable read. The book is about fifteen year old Jack Finnegan, an average teenager who has had his share of childhood problems and inadequacies.

And, it’s in this fifteenth year that a radical change transforms his life. It is an adjustment that centers on Jacks’ school acquaintance Anna Shepherd, Mr. Shepherd (Anna’s dad and Jack’s teacher) and Mr. Green (another teacher). People he thought he knew; however, what a surprise for him when he learns they are not what they betrayed themselves to be. Also, if that is not enough to comprehend, Jack has to deal with unsavory Deathlord aliens who are wreaking havoc and destroying anything and everything that crosses their path.

I like the growth that Jack’s character achieves along the way turning him from a laid-back teenager into a more focused and responsible individual. The things Jack endures are more than he ever could have envisioned. In this book, you will come across zombies, different alien races, spaceships, a princess and more.

I would put this book in the young reader’s category only because of the dialog used; I think a pre-teen/teenager would have a deeper appreciation for it. Nonetheless, if you are an adult that enjoys reading science fiction stories with lots of action, adventure, and bits of humor thrown in here and there, then this story is right up your alley. It was a fun read, and I’ve already referred this book to a few young readers.  For more information on this book you can visit http://matthewkadish.com/.

Until later,

R. Lynn Archie

website:  http://www.rlynnarchie.com

Copyrighting a Book

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Book copyright protection is a question that comes up regularly from writers. Especially true now, when book manuscripts can travel by digital means like through email. It’s common to want to learn how best to safeguard your document whether it’s in eBook or manuscript form. There’s no doubt that when you are transmitting your document there is always the potential for it to pass through several hands, as well as different eyes seeing it, and who wouldn’t feel uneasy passing along their work in its unpublished state. Quite frankly, the first thing that came to mind for me was how do I control ownership?

There’s a good article on Copyrighting a Book. Although this isn’t the original one that was my guide, it does contain a lot of identical information. There are three different methods you can follow to safeguard yourself:  1) Secure Automatic Protection, 2) Get Official Registration and 3) Take Advantage of Registration Services. It’s pretty much you’re choice how you want to go about it, but I am strongly recommending it. Visit the article to read more about how you can protect the rights of your document.

R. Lynn

website:  www.rlynnarchie.com

Should You Include a Prologue in Your Novel?

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Not every book contains a prologue, but at one point in time, my curiosity got the best of me, and I needed to know if prologues are necessary. After reading up on the subject, and this is strictly my opinion, I would say no. I believe it depends on the preference of the author on rather or not it would be a good fit.

For those that do not know, a prologue, sometimes referred to as a preface, is an introduction at the beginning of a novel. This form of introduction is an excellent way to give readers the general idea of your story while at the same time piquing their interest. The bonus being that a reader can get a quick feel of your style of writing.

From firsthand experience, it’s not always easy to write a prologue that is suitable for your story. I included one in my novel Eternal Existence that fits in nicely, where I did not with Trial of Marriage.

Nonetheless, if deciding to go in that direction, there is a good explanatory article called How to Write a Prologue that states some useful tips to follow. Overall, you want your prologue:  to be interesting, be sure the length is appropriate, keep the language/tone consistent within the prologue, and limit the background information. If you follow these straightforward rules you cannot go wrong.

Happy writing,

R. Lynn

Website Information:  www.rlynnarchie.com