Using Points of View (POV) in Your Writing

POINTS OF VIEW

When I first began writing, I wasn’t aware that stories were written in points of view. So, what is a point of view? Simply put, it’s a way that writers allow readers to see and hear what’s going on. Point of view in books will contain detail, opinion, or emotion the author wants to accentuate; therefore, a point of view catches the attention of the reader.

The Three Major Kinds of POV

First-person point of view involves the use of either of the two pronouns “I” and “we”. The advantage of this point of view is that you get to hear the thoughts of the narrator, and see the world depicted in the story through his or her eyes. A good novel selection would be Twilight by Stephanie Meyers. The main female character Bella Swan is the narrator; we see things from her point of view.

  • (Example) “I loved Phoenix. I loved the sun and the blistering heat. I loved the vigorous, sprawling city.”

Second-person point of view, the narrator tells the story to another character using “you” and “your”. This is the least used POV. You will see this used more in literature such as a cook book. Although a perfect selection of a novel used this way would be Jay McInerney’s, Bright Lights, Big City.

  • (Example) “You are not the kind of guy who would be at a place like this at this time of the morning. But here you are, and you cannot say that the terrain is entirely unfamiliar, although the details are fuzzy.”

Third-person point of view is the most popular of the three and uses pronouns like “he”, “she”, “it”, “they” or a name. The narrator isn’t present as a character. The writer may choose third-person omniscient in which the thoughts of every character are open to the reader, or third-person limited, in which the reader enters only one character’s mind, either throughout the entire work or in a specific section. A good third person POV book is Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

Examples:

  • When Jane and Elizabeth were alone, the former, who had been cautious in her praise of Mr. Bingley before, expressed to her sister how very much she admired him.
  • “He is just what a young man ought to be,” said she, “sensible, good humoured, lively; and I never saw such happy manners!”

My preference is third person point of view because it’s what I feel the most comfortable with, and it allows me complete freedom in telling my story. I would like to hear from you. Tell me, what point of view you use in your writing?

 

R. Lynn

 

Helpful Tips for New Indie Authors

Helpful Tips

I noted in my prior post that it’s been a year since self-publishing my first romance novel, and I have to admit that my journey on becoming an indie author has been an enjoyable one. Throughout the year I’ve received so much useful writing advice and information; all which has helped me grow as a writer.

In this post I’m giving back in hopes of helping others; my advice for new indie authors starting out would be, have patience and stay committed. Everyone has hopes and dreams of becoming rich and famous, but realistically there’s a chance that might never happen. Nonetheless, that doesn’t mean you can’t succeed in what you love doing, and what I mean by that is whatever you’re passionate about just stay focused on executing your goal from start to finish. When you can accomplish that then you will always succeed by coming out on top.

Lastly, one final point I’m going to share is do not burn yourself out. I did that writing my first and second novel by not allowing any downtime in between — that was such a bad idea and a big no-no. Nowadays, it’s mandatory that I take breaks in between writing projects. Trust me, even something as small as doing nothing for a weekend but being idle will do you a world of good.

Just remember when it comes to your writing routine make sure you choose a non-stressful schedule that works best for you. All things considered, being an indie author is great, and the best part for me is there’s no one to answer to because I’m the boss!

Talk to you soon,

R. Lynn

Website: www.rlynnarchie.com
Email: info@rlynnarchie.com

Why Is It Like Pulling Nails To Get A Book Review?

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Come December 2014 it will be two years since I began writing. All in all, I’ve enjoyed sharing my thoughts and stories, but one thing I’m still struggling with is getting book reviews on Amazon.

It puzzles me because my books get a decent amount of sells. In addition, even with giving away free copies I still only manage to get between five to ten reviews. Don’t get me wrong, I’m grateful for the ones that take a moment of their time to leave one. Yet, I remain amazed when I see other self-published authors such as myself getting huge numbers of reviews and it really peaks my interest in learning what their secret is in achieving such a productive response?

I do know that Goodreads is a good source and they have groups that offer read for reads or book swaps in return for an honest review; unfortunately, with my busy schedule that option just won’t work for me.

Honestly, I don’t think readers realize just how valuable their input is for authors. Their response helps a lot because it reaffirm if an authors book have gone in the right direction or not. In reading up on this topic I came across a few great tips that readers should know:

  • Don’t be afraid of being honest. Do, however, remember to be helpful (and not mean). Don’t just say “it sucks” but tell everyone why it sucked.
  • Don’t give away the ending of the book. You can allude to it very vaguely (“the ending surprised me”) but don’t say specific plot details.
  • You’re not being graded. Write a review as long or short as you want. It doesn’t have to be a masterpiece of art—think of it more as a conversation or what you might tell people you know about this book.
  • Make sure that you read the book before you review. This seems like it should be obvious but… it’s not.

I can only speak from my standpoint but if you’ve experienced the same or can shed some light on the question I would love to hear from you.

R. Lynn

 

FREE EBOOK PROMOTION

PROMO SIGN

 

If you are an author you’ll be happy to learn that the site  Author Corner will promote your eBook for free.  All you have to do is provide: 1) A cover of your book; 2) A brief description; 3) One or more purchase links; and 4) Categories for your book. It’s that simple.

Take a minute to visit their growing BookShelf — you’ll find some interesting eBooks in all different genres.

KDP: Updates Regarding Series Books

 

 

Kindle Direct Publishing

 

Recently, I contacted Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) inquiring about series books, and there was a discussion about some new things happening soon that I thought I would share.

KDP is making updates to the way series books get listed on Amazon.com. Series books are books with multiple volumes whether they’re each complete books, or individual sections of a longer book. In making these books easier for customers to find, in mid-May they are updating how they organize them in the Kindle Store.

The detail pages will now display the title for series books as Title: Subtitle (Series Title Book Volume). KDP states these changes will help make sure that customers can find all of your books easily.

Here’s how KDP instructed series information should be used:

Series Title: Your Series Title in KDP should be the name of the series. By ensuring that all books in a series have the same value for Series Title, you will improve the discoverability of your books.

Volume: Enter only a numerical value (e.g. 1, 2, 3; not “Book 5” or “Book V”)

For example, if the name of your books is The World and is the second book within your Science Facts book series, your information would be as follows:
Book title: The World
Series title: Science Facts
Volume: 2

The title for this book will show up as The World (Science Facts Book 2). I hope this is information is helpful.

R. Lynn Archie

Mind Mapping Can Be a Useful Tool

New Picture

Plain and simple, a mind map is a graphical way to represent ideas and concepts. It is a visual thinking tool that helps with structuring your information and makes it easier for you to analyze, understand, remember, recall and create new ideas.

Mind Mapping can be created by hand or software.  Some software is free and there are others that need to be purchased.  In addition, and because it’s not noted in the linked article, if you know how to use Microsoft Office Excel, it’s another good substitution for creating mind maps.

Whichever way you decide, it all starts out with a starting point to which you write down the main idea that you want to develop. From there, you are going to expand by building supporting subtopics, and as you do so, you connect each of them with a line back to the main idea.

The subtopic step will be repeated so that you can make as many lower layers as needed to support your main idea. Just remember that for each new lower level, it needs to be connected to the top corresponding subtopic.  See diagrams below.

 rectangle

I think mind mapping is a great diagram to follow because you can always go back and reference it when you’re stuck or forget something.  Give it a try; it might be a helpful tool for you.

Thanks for visiting,

R. Lynn Archie

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Book Review: Earthman Jack vs. The Ghost Planet

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First let me say this is not romance book, but science fiction.  Every now and then I do like reading something different.  I have to say that “Earthman Jack vs. The Ghost Planet” was an enjoyable read. The book is about fifteen year old Jack Finnegan, an average teenager who has had his share of childhood problems and inadequacies.

And, it’s in this fifteenth year that a radical change transforms his life. It is an adjustment that centers on Jacks’ school acquaintance Anna Shepherd, Mr. Shepherd (Anna’s dad and Jack’s teacher) and Mr. Green (another teacher). People he thought he knew; however, what a surprise for him when he learns they are not what they betrayed themselves to be. Also, if that is not enough to comprehend, Jack has to deal with unsavory Deathlord aliens who are wreaking havoc and destroying anything and everything that crosses their path.

I like the growth that Jack’s character achieves along the way turning him from a laid-back teenager into a more focused and responsible individual. The things Jack endures are more than he ever could have envisioned. In this book, you will come across zombies, different alien races, spaceships, a princess and more.

I would put this book in the young reader’s category only because of the dialog used; I think a pre-teen/teenager would have a deeper appreciation for it. Nonetheless, if you are an adult that enjoys reading science fiction stories with lots of action, adventure, and bits of humor thrown in here and there, then this story is right up your alley. It was a fun read, and I’ve already referred this book to a few young readers.  For more information on this book you can visit http://matthewkadish.com/.

Until later,

R. Lynn Archie

website:  http://www.rlynnarchie.com